a communal post from heyfoureyes, suibhne_geilt, & sasha_feather

A group of us were sitting around tonight, talking about how to get writing done!

la_luna_llena says, "Letting yourself freewrite for even 15 minutes a day is a good idea. You can do it anywhere -- the bus, the break room, even the bathroom. Sometimes this kicks off an idea that you can build on."

sasha_feather says:
Being part of a writers' group is great for me, because it gives me deadlines. Nothing motivates me like a deadline!
Hanging out with writers and talking about it has been a terrific motivator as well. It can help give you perspective on your work.
Try to have fun with your writing!

suibhne_geilt says:

One of the things that I learned from the hell that is NaNoWriMo is that you've got to seek out the plots that are hidden in the world around you, and just let yourself run with it. Play the "what if" game, even if you drag it to the point of absurdity, because somewhere in there, you might find something that'll catch your imagination enough to keep your interest through the slog of actually writing a story.

That being said, this year, I've also had to teach myself to undo some of the bad NaNo habits, like simply running with any damn idea that happens to blow through your head. Sometimes, it's OK to say "y'know, that's a really crappy idea, and if I follow it, I'll write myself into a dead end." So I've been finding that balance point between letting a story run where it will, and being very deliberate about what I actually do or do not set to paper.
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WisCon!

Raise your hand if you'll be at WisCon this weekend!

I will be there and I'm very excited. This will in fact be my very first sci-fi convention! I'm also planning on attending the LiveJournal party. Hope to see you there!

Women writing op-ed pieces

March 15, 2007 NY Times
Stop the Presses, Boys! Women Claim Space on Op-Ed Pages
By PATRICIA COHEN

Whatever other reasons may explain the lack of women’s voices on the nation’s op-ed pages, the lack of women asking to be there is clearly part of the problem. Many opinion page editors at major newspapers across the country say that 65 or 75 percent of unsolicited manuscripts, or more, come from men.

The obvious solution, at least to Catherine Orenstein, an author, activist and occasional op-ed page contributor herself, was to get more women to submit essays. To that end Ms. Orenstein has been training women at universities, foundations and corporations to write essays and get them published.
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mucha

5 days until 24 Hour Comics Day!

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What is a 24 hour comic?

The 24 hour comic challenge is for a cartoonist to completely create a 24 page comics story in 24 straight hours.

Is this really the best way to make a great comic?

Probably not (although some really cool comics have been made this way), but that's not the real goal. The goal is to have the experience of trying. It's a creative exercise that can teach you a lot about what you're capable of.

THE DARE:

To create a complete 24 page comic book in 24 continuous hours.


That means everything: Story, finished art, lettering, colors (if you want 'em), paste-up, everything! Once pen hits paper, the clock starts ticking. 24 hours later, the pen lifts off the paper, never to descend again. Even proofreading has to occur in the 24 hour period. [Computer-generated comics are fine of course, same principles apply]

No sketches, designs, plot summaries or any other kind of direct preparation can precede the 24 hour period. Indirect preparation such as assembling tools, reference materials, food, music etc. is fine.

Your pages can be any size, any material. Carve 'em in stone; print 'em with rubber stamps; draw 'em on your kitchen walls with a magic marker. Anything.

The 24 hours are continuous. You can take a nap if you like but the clock will continue to tick! If you get to 24 hours and you're not done, either end it there ("the Gaiman Variation") or keep going until you're done ("the Eastman Variation"). I consider both of these the Noble Failure Variants and true 24 hour comics in spirit; but you must sincerely intend to do the 24 pages in 24 hours at the outset.

**a "hello, i'm going to be there!" email would be appreciated but not required. any comments/questions/concerns can be emailed to 24hourcomicmadison@gmail.com - thanks!!!!**

thanks to dane101.com and rainbow bookstore co-op for their support!
mucha

24 Hour Comic Day, Oct 7th!!

Hey guys! My name is Daniella. I've organized a 24 Hour Comic day at Escape Coffee Gallery on Oct. 7 to Oct. 8th (from noon till noon). The dare: To create a complete 24 page comic book in 24 continuous hours.

That means everything: Story, finished art, lettering, colors (if you want 'em), paste-up, everything! Once pen hits paper, the clock starts ticking. 24 hours later, the pen lifts off the paper, never to descend again. Even proofreading has to occur in the 24 hour period. [Computer-generated comics are fine of course, same principles apply]

You can find out more information at http://24hourcomics.com/. We also have a myspace page, http://blog.myspace.com/24hourcomicmadison. Its going to be free! I really hope that you will be interested. You can email me at 24hourcomicmadison@gmail.com.

P.S. Webcomics are totally cool to do also! Escape has wireless internet and is laptop friendly.

I hope to see you then! Let me know! Thank you!
Typewriter

Wrimo-ers?

Hey there ...

There has been a lot of activity on the nanowrimo community recently ... so, I was wondering ... how many of you guys are Wrimoers?

Last year was my first year and I wasn't in Madison for the lovely heyday of NaNo ... what sorts of things do you guys do?
bedroom
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Anyone interested?

Hey all,

The writing group I'm in just went down one member, and we're looking for someone new.
We meet every other Saturday from 10:30am to 12:30pm downtown. Typically we critique 3 pieces for a meeting. It's mostly short fiction and chapters of novels. Any questions, let me know.
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